Moon People on Mother’s Day

In honor of Mother’s Day in America — and for new friends and followers of my blog I want to take this opportunity to re-publish a piece of writing I did when I was 12 years old! 

I give thanks to my mother and father for giving me a room with a view in which to write to my heart’s content.

web-Moon

Moon People – Friday 25 February 1977

When moon people grow old, they do not die. They just vanish into thin air, like smoke – and talking of smoke, I must tell you about their diet, which is precisely the same for everyone. When they feel hungry, they light a fire and roast some frogs on it – for there are lots of these creatures flying around in the air. Then while the frogs are roasting, they draw up chairs around the fire, as if it were a sort of dining-room table, and gobble up the smoke.

That is all they ever eat. And to quench their thirst they just squeeze some air into a glass and drink that: the liquid produced is rather like dew.

Bald men are considered very handsome on the moon, and long hair is thought absolutely revolting. But on young stars like the comets, which have not yet lost their hair, it is just the other way round. Or so I was told by a comet-dweller who was having a holiday on the moon when I was there.

I forgot to mention that they wear their beards a little above the knee; and they have not any toenails, for the very good reason that they have not any toes. What they have got, however, is a large cabbage growing just above the buttocks like a tail. It is always in flower, and never gets broken, even if they fall on their backs.

When they blow their noses, what comes out is extremely sour honey, and when they have been working hard or taking strenuous exercise, they swear milk at every pore. Occasionally, they turn it into cheese, by adding a few drops of the honey. They also make olive oil out of onions, and the resulting fluid is extremely rich and has a very delicate perfume.

They have any number of vines, which produce not wine but water, for the grapes are made of ice; and there, in my view, you have the scientific explanation of hail storms, which occur whenever the wind is strong enough to blow the fruit off the vines.

They use their stomachs as handbags for carrying things around in, for they can open and shut them at will. If you look inside one, there is nothing to be seen in the way of digestive organs, but the whole interior is lined with fur so that it can also be used as a centrally-heated pram for babies in cold weather.

The upper class people wear clothes made of flexible glass, but the material is rather expensive, so most people have to be content with copper textiles. For there is any amount of copper in the soil, which becomes as soft as wool when soaked in water.

I hardly like to tell you about their eyes, for fear you should think I’m exaggerating, because it really does sound incredible. Still, I might as well risk it, so goes: their eyes are detachable!!

As for ears, they have to be satisfied with a couple of plane-tree leaves.

I must just mention one other thing I saw in the King’s Palace on the moon. It was a large mirror suspended over a fairly shallow tank. If you got into the tank you could hear everything that was being said on Earth, and if you looked in the mirror, you could see what was going on anywhere in the world, as clearly as if you were actually there yourself.

I had a look at all the people I knew at home, but whether they me saw me or not I cannot really say.

50 thoughts on “Moon People on Mother’s Day

    • Hi, yes, I wrote this when I was 12! I used to love watching children’s sci-fi shows. Delighted you liked the bit about “the centrally-heated stomach prams”. An innovation still to be adopted:-) Thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts. Peace and blessings. Michele

  1. Ace! I love the idea of sneezing honey, what a bizarre and wonderful poem, filled me with glee. I must note that bald men are not only handsome on the moon though! Loved this, Michele:)

    • Kieran (Baldy) your comments always make me smile. And I love that you made me and your wife blush in the same week! You’re so wonderful:-) Really delighted that you liked this bizarre poem. Now that you’ve read a few of my pieces is it clear to you that I was born a nutcase?!! And, yes, isn’t it reassuring to know that there are bald guys on the moon? Blessings to you. Michele

      • I believe the technical term is ‘fruitloop’ and all the best people are, Michele! *grins*:)

  2. Additional: the reason for visiting today was your comment about mother’s day apperaing in my email, I had no idea that mother’s day was not universally celebrated, we had ours weeks ago in the UK. Hasppy Mother’s day to all the mums of America! Mother is the name of God in the hearts and minds of all children:)

  3. What a wonderful story. Wow, you were a writer at 12 years old. The sky is the limit, I hope you return to the moon again. I like to read what the moon people are doing these days.

    • Ms. Vee, thank you for more of your wonderful words of encouragement. I’d love to fly to the moon and write a travel piece about my time there! Maybe say “Hello” to a few a folks I wrote about in 1977!! Oh well, I’d better stop now before my imagination takes me away… God bless you. Michele

    • Laughter!! What can I say? When I read this piece again tonight I was thinking to myself “Wow, how did I dream up this stuff?” Like, the copper textiles??? I had a pretty weird upbringing and, as a result, I had to grow up very fast. Writing was my escape route. Perhaps it still is?! Thanks for reading. Happy Mother’s Day to you.

  4. Highly inventive for a 12 year old. I wish I could write like this now, they always say that viewing the world through a child’s eyes is one of the hardest (if not impossible) thing to do, as an adult.

  5. Wow. This took me back through time, I think, to when I received my first telescope, and I thought to search for people on the moon. This is unbelievable, not in that farfetched way that I could imagine adults might mean upon first reading a tale such as this, but in that way that, somehow, as children, we’re all the same, I think, looking for people on the moon, imagining whole other worlds and bringing them to life. But the detail with which you did it, and at 12. Incredible. At 12, I was emulating the artists of my favorite Japanese animated cartoons and failing miserably.

    What a very awesome tale, Michele! :)

  6. Wonderful piece M. You really do inspire me with your extraordinary view of the world. You are as equally rare as you claim me to be my dear friend. I’m glad to know you, love and blessings
    Lady Isis x

  7. How wonderful it would be if all twelve year olds approached their writing with an imagination such as yours. Thanks for stopping by and following WoollyMuses. I will be watching for more of your posts.

  8. I second pretty much everything everyone said so far:) I am so impressed right now, this story is so out of this world (pun intended hehe) This is the perfect representation of the limitlessness of our mind! What an incredible gift we are blessed with…this brain of ours! I guess I will be force-feeding sci-fi movies to my kids , I’ll get back to you with the results in a few years😛

  9. what a lovely, inventive and playful thing this is. i would like to have been friends when you were 12. tony

  10. My, what a vivid imagination you had (have). Thoroughly enjoyed the piece although at first glance I thought your title was a suggestion of something we should do on Mothers Day:)

  11. What a wonderful piece of writing, and how great to have a room with a view😉
    Thanks for your very thoughtful comments on my blog. This is an illuminating and creative space to visit.

  12. this is such a creative piece with such interesting ideas. Delight in the moon people making olive oil out of onions and cheese from their sweat mixed with honey.

  13. Such writing at such a young age! Many kids, or most, kids possess imagination, but to actually capture it and make a very enchanting story out of it is something very few do.:)

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